One of the things that I am taking out of The Data School, apart from the Tableau and Alteryx knowledge, is soft-skills:

  • How to Present
  • How to communicate
  • How to deal with clients
  • How to ask for help
  • And so on and so on.

In this blog post, I will reveal some of the “How to communicate” aspects, more specifically, some of the words that I’ve learnt with my cohortians. I hope they are so helpful to you as they were to me.

Disclaimer: I am from Portugal – English is not my first language – so it was not that difficult to pick up on new words – loads of them were new to me.

Ajar

adjective – (of a door or other opening) slightly open.

This was an important one for me as I always prefer people to leave the door ajar and not completely closed but neither wide open. I thought there was not a specific word for this in English, but I was wrong.

Nah

determiner, exclamation, adverb & noun – non-standard spelling of no

Just the coolest way of saying no!!

Dinner as Lunch and Lunch as Dinner

Apparently, some people use the size (or the hotness? I do not entirely understand this concept!) of a meal rather than the time of the day to name their meals! I was shocked the first time I heard one of my cohortians saying “Oh, I need to grab my dinner” during our lunchtime…

Cohortians

The name that Jonathan created to refer to people that are in the same cohort. We stopped being colleagues and we are now cohortians!

Self-seeker

a person who seeks his or her own interest or selfish ends.

Mingle

verb – move among and engage with others at a social function.

This one will always remind me of fun times as I’ve learnt it in one of our social events! (The Information Lab is great with those, by the way)

Git

noun – an unpleasant or contemptible person.

Do you pronounce the “t” in this one? Because I’ve heard of some people who do, and others who don’t…

Floordrobe

noun – an untidy heap of discarded clothing left on the floor of a room.

This may be the funniest word I’ve ever heard and I can’t believe it is actually a real word!

Tongue-Tied

adjective – too shy or embarrassed to speak.

Do I really need to admit that this was something always happening to me?

My ends

A way of referring to where you are from (neighbourhood, town/city, region etc.)

According to my cohortians, Swindon is the best “my (well… not mine, but let’s pretend!) ends” of all.

Even though this was a bit of a more informal blog post, I believe this is a reflection of a bit of our time in the Data School: I can not stress enough how much I have learnt (and will continue to learn), but I can not stress enough how much fun we had as well.